The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec Blu-ray Review

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adele blanc sec

Luc Besson’s foreign film The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec is a sci-fi fantasy that shows much like the comic book adventures on which it is based.  Set in Paris 1911, its complicated plot (female Indiana Jones meets The Mummy) casts Louise Bourgoin as authoress-heroine Adele driven to save her catatonic sister Agathe’s life.  Her search for a cure takes her to Egypt’s tombs where she is thwarted by Professor Dieuleveult, her arch nemesis.

Meanwhile Professor Esperandieu, the man who has been helping her, hatches a 136 million year old pterosaur egg which escapes  bringing terror and death to the city.  Inept cops and a bumbling Inspector Leoonce Caponi imprison Esperandieu who escapes jail after several attempts with the help of master of disguise Adele.  Esperandieu and the pterosaur tied together by fate die.

At the Musee du Louvre, Adele awakens the spirits of Ramesses II’s Nuclear Physicist who takes her to the Pharoah and his advisers. Computer animation and special effects bring them to life.  After his doctor revives Agathe,  Ramesses and his court enjoy  an action-adventure romp in the city.  After all that has happened, Adele decides she needs a vacation and books a sea trip on the RMS Titanic and a possible Adele Blanc-Sec sequel.

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec is available August 13, 2013.  Its Blu-ray, DVD and digital copy lists for $24.97.  Rated PG, it has a 1 hour 47 minutes running time and includes special features like The Making of the Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec Featuring Interviews with Cast and Crew, Deleted Scenes, and Music featurette.

Photography is vivid; scripting fantastic but amusing; fun entertainment if nothing more. This foreign film is certainly not what I expected. Thanks, Shout Factory, for an alternate cinema show that works for imaginative viewers.